Featured Flowers

4K Drone footage of Olallie Daylily Gardens: Aug 1, 2018

 

 

 

Well before the daylilies begin blooming, we enjoy the appearance of a variety of wildflowers and violets. The Violets seem to pop up in various spots in both sun and shade, but typically tucked under a tree or near some rocks.

The wildflowers appear in the understory of trees on the edges of fields. They bloom and go dormant surprisingly quickly. 

 

Viola sororia 'Freckles': A large patch of these just appeared this year!

 

Viola sororia priceana AKA Confederate Violets: These seem to be a cross between common purple and white V. sororia.

The common name seems to refer to the uniforms worn by the Confederate troops.

 

Viola pubescens (I believe), I serendipitously captured this spider making it's home under one leaf of the violet.

 

Primula veris: Not truly a wildflower, as I planted these but I love them. Blooming early in the spring in shady and part sunny locations,

I enjoy the way they pop up here and there.

Dog Tooth Violets, Wild Ginger and some small Dutch Man's Breeches all coexist in a woodland garden under an old 

Apple tree. This garden was planted over 50 years ago I believe.

A large patch of wild Ginger growing next to our little stream.

This mix of annuals is currently adorning my little seating nook by the entrance to my barn. From left to right:

Begonia boliviensis, Plectranthus, Fuchsia, Comellina and Scented Geraniums.

All of these plants were overwintered in my basement. The advantage of this approach is the plants start out large and in the case of the Fuchsia ready to bloom as it fulfills the dormancy needed to bloom well.


Begonia boliviensis: Bonfire. I just love this plant. Good long blooms and wonderful pigmented leaves. These do grow as a tuber that will go dormant in the winter, but with a little encouragement the will continue to grow and bloom (a little) through the winter. I've even grown them from seed I collected, though the seed is like dust and plants are so slow to mature.


Plectranthus: I'm not sure of which variety this is but with a little help from google one should be able to figure it out. 

I like this Plectranthus as it is one of the largest and the margins turn a golden yellow.


Fuchsia: This is a great showpiece plant as each bloom is a work of art! No blooms to show in the photo,

but they are spectacular!

Fuchsia #1

Fuchsia #1

 

Fuchsia #3


 

This variegated scented geranium is one of my favorites. Each leaf has a different degree and pattern of 

variegation on the leaves.


 

 

And last but not least is Pequin pepper. While one doesn't think of peppers as perennials they are! This plant is over 3 years old. 

It has survived inside in my bedroom fine for the winter, and is now blooming and setting fruit like crazy! The form of the plant is beautiful too.

 

Lots of baby Pequin plants have appeared in the soil below the momma plant!

We've had a few early surprises, but mostly just lots of scapes! Real bloom will begin in about 7-10 days I expect.

The first three flowers, are apparently the result of rebloom scapes that never got a chance to bloom last year and just popped up early this year. Without a good long growing season to allow the scapes to develop they ended up being just 6 inches tall.

 

Saratoga Springtime

 

H. yezonensis

H. middendorfii 'Japan Hybrid' red bract

 

 

Various scapes popping up in my "UP early" bed.

 

While just a small trumpet yellow, this daylily is blooming before anything else. No of the Iris have even begun to bloom.

One of my all time favorites: H. fulva 'Kwanso" variegata. The foliage is just so stunning, and the variation in the variegation really adds to the interesting aspect of this plant. I have my tucked into the corner of my barn and a small flower bed, where it can easily be contained!